Photo Blog 52

Picture 12

Welcome to Photo Blog 50 something, how are your images looking? That good, ‘eh? Awesome. What do you use? Oh one of them, can’t say that’s ever really interested me very much.. i mean i know it’s always been there but i’ve never really said to myself “i really need to get me one of those expensive lomo cameras that everyone uses” but you’ve swayed me a bit.  I’m not going to go out and buy one but i think now i’ll see this style in a different light mainly because of these results from Jen using her Holga camera:

Or more so her outlook on using this camera;

“When using a Holga, or other toy camera, you are stripped down to the bare essentials. You, and a piece of plastic. No technicalities, fancy setups, or photoshop. It’s just you and the film. One of my favourite quotes is: “Moderation is a fatal thing. Nothing succeeds like excess.” (Oscar Wilde) I believe that experimenting and pushing the boundaries is the only way to grow and truly experience photography.

My tools and materials of choice, consisting of film paired with a simple plastic Holga camera, allow me to strip away the technical details and get to the ‘heart’ of the matter – the emotions and personal identity that I desire to explore. The images are thus imperfect, something that we can all relate to.”

Now that I can appreciate, my thoughts on lomo before this mainly consisted of ermm that plastic vintage looking box that people use so they can think of themselves of a photographer, that hipster style that looks cool that everyone loves because it’s cool (bit harsh yes, don’t hate me i’m entitled to an opinion :P haha). I never really took to mainstream stuff anyway so it’s probably my own fault I didn’t know a great deal about lomography, i didn’t take the time to look into it  and i guess my opinion on it wasn’t well rounded. Damn, I hardly ever do that, i always look at every side before making an opinion instead of making a snap judgement- i guess i’m pretty protective of my field even though i’m quite open to new methods, styles and ideas, it’s just that  lot of people now who pick up a camera call themselves a photographer and I am getting more and more cautious.

But here, this technique and the experimentation involved, this “stripping” of the over-technical aspects to get to the heart of the image and subject is a wonderful perspective and notion. Rather than being concerned with getting a pretty image, this photographer goes deeper and produces aesthetic images with the bare minimum, presenting her talent and the idea that you’d don’t need the top of the line camera to create beautiful, meaningful work.

She has indulged in self-expression projects too:

“I find out things about myself when I shoot, and when I view the end result. Some of the shots do not even look like me, or what I perceive myself to be, or to look like. This is definitely not a vanity project or something I do to draw attention to myself. Its like an alternate reality in my head – I know it’s me, but at the same time I find myself debating whether I see myself or someone else? A fictional character perhaps or something from my dreams. I find this fascinating – and learning how my emotions can really lead me in different directions is a great experience as well.
I’ve broken down my photos into a few categories for more clarification: Once I Dreamed I Was, Emotional Reality. and Personal Fiction.”

 

So I’ve done my research: http://uk.shop.lomography.com/cameras, http://microsites.lomography.com/holga/family/holga-35mm :

“Every picture displayed an other-worldly presence, with soft-focus tones, misty colors, and streaming lights.”

I’m especially pleased to find Lomography fundamentals;

“Free yourself from rules, embrace random results, disarm your subjects, engage individuality, get your hands dirty.”

Could you want any more freedom? Generally, I think this idea of using a toy camera is brilliant- it makes you go riiiggght back to the beginning- the basics, step one of learning so you can bounce back with something more; “pushing the boundaries is the only way to grow and truly experience photography.”

Yes you could also go out and get a very complex camera that makes you think about every single tiny detail, but you’ll still be going through the same thought process of concentrating on everything and how to get the outcome you want, instead of just turning to auto on your new-expensive-digi-that-means-you’re-a-photographer. It’s aaallll about the creativity, individuality, innovation and imagination :) CIII. Think that’ll catch on? No, me neither. Worth a shot though.

http://www.facebook.com/HolgaJen

http://holgajen.com/home.html

holgajen.blogspot.com/

https://twitter.com/#!/HolgaJen

http://www.flickr.com/photos/holgajen/

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